A Tale of Two Irish Whiskeys

Discovering a new favorite Irish whiskey.

I was recently gifted a bottle of The Quiet Man traditional Irish Whiskey (http://thequietmanirishwhiskey.com/) by Mike of White Stag Trading Co. (http://www.whitestagtrading.com/). The majority of my Irish whiskey experience can be traced back to younger days, enjoying Jameson primarily as a shot, not really giving much thought to what subtleties might present within. I decided this would be a good time to revisit the classic (to establish a baseline), before exploring the newcomer to my world.

What can be said about Jameson? How many times had I over imbibed to the point of regret on this nectar in my early to mid-twenties before allowing it to slip from my regularly scheduled programming, only coming back as a part of a Hot Toddy when needed? I used to really like it, and then it slowly disappeared. It was a bit more yellow in color than I remembered, almost radiant. Light nose, light taste, almost grassy, with sweet end notes, and a familiar burn at the end. It’s a solid drink choice, widely available, and familiar to millions. Not being blown away, but having established a solid baseline, it was time to move on.

I hope you didn't need picture to visualize this. I didn't want to get more than airplane bottle...that should tell you where this is headed.
I hope you didn’t need picture to visualize this. I didn’t want to get more than airplane bottle…that should tell you where this is headed.
This is amazing, and it is my opinion that if you like whiskey, you need it in your life.
This is amazing, and it is my opinion that if you like whiskey, you need it in your life.

The Quiet Man has a nice story on the side of its bottle about the distiller’s father being a bartender in Belfast, and where its name originates from. I always find little touches like this as having a way about them that can endear me to a product. I know it sounds silly, but I like to know a little bit about where what I’m getting myself into is coming from…unless its light beer, then I don’t care, then I just want light beer. So having poured a glass, the first thing I noted was that it still had that yellow tinge, but was paler than Jameson. It had a floral nose, but what struck me was how rich the flavor was. It had a bit of the grassiness from Jameson but was dominated by more malts, and a big almost buttery finish that possessed a subtle but welcome sweetness. I’m in love. This is wonderful Irish whiskey, and I feel spoiled for future encounters with lesser varieties.

So thanks Mike, you may have brought me back into the world of Irish whiskeys with this one.

Your host,

Charlie Mewshaw